This thesis, from Dr Jo Watson, is about the human right of people with severe or profound intellectual disability to drive their own decisions. These people usually have others make decisions for them. This, in Australia, is called substitute decision making.
The United Nations Convention on the Rights of People with Disabilities (UNCRPD) says substitute decision-making should not exist. Supported decision-making is an approach that many people think is better.
Supported decision-making is a way of helping someone to make decisions. People with severe or profound intellectual disability rely on people who know and love them for support to do most things. This is particularly true for decision-making.
This thesis is about a research study that looked at how people with severe or profound intellectual disability are supported to make decisions.
Five people with severe or profound intellectual disability and their WATSON THESIS (2016) 29 supporters participated in the study. The researcher spent time with each of these five people and their supporters over six months. Read the full Thesis here:  
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